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. and if not because religion is a protected group there could be a reo religious claim brought against them. gay people are not protected from any kind of discrimination by the religious print. >> in that analogy, the gay group is not a religious group so if this law passed they couldn't argue on religious grounds that they wouldn't print up this stuff for the west borough baptist church. >> exactly right. what's really striking about this, nobody except for at the very end i thought it was really telling he used the example of gay people. nobody is willing either tonight or in your prior interviews to say the word "gay" in defending bill. an entire interview they tap danced around the word "gay." if you go to yarbrough, he was up front about saying the situation in new mexico where a photographer was forced to take photographs of same sex couples commitment ceremony or wedding. >> she was sued because she wouldn't in new mexico which violates the state statutes in new mexico protecting discrimination against people based on sexual orientation. but you're right. early on a lot of lawmakers were
appalling to hear a dialogue that talks about using religion to discriminate against both myself and my community. you know, when i was in high sdoo school, i was actually assaulted because i was gay. as a result, i spent most of my life down playing the fact. you know, i don't ride in pride parades and i don't really wear it on my cuff, but i really feel compelled to really put it out there. you know, i don't think that we deserve a bill like this anywhere in this country. >> joining me now, damian klinko, the arizona state representative you just heard from and washington post columnist jonathan capehart. what made you speak about the bill the way you did, using your own personal reference, which as you said is not something that you are inclined to do. >> i used my own story because this is a personal attack against me and everyone in the lgbt community in the state of arizona. the community doesn't deserve this sort of treatment. and i don't think there's ever an excuse that we should sanction discrimination against a minority group. it makes me sad and disappointed in a state that
across the country. here's the meat of 1062 in arizona. "exercise of religion means the practice of or observance of religion, including the ability to act or refusal to act in a manner substantially motivated by a religious belief whether or not the exercise is compulsory or central to a larger system of religious belief." here is hb 376 in ohio. "exercise of religion means the practice or observance of religion. it includes but is not limited to the ability to act or the refusal to act in a manner that is substantially motivated by one's sincerely held religious belief, whether or not it's central to a larger system of larger belief." it's almost identical language, and that's no accident. sb 1062 and hb 376 and legislation in other states all share the same legal genetic code traceable back to a number of christian conservative special interest groups in the case of 1062, an outfit called the center for arizona policy, another called the alliance defending freedom didn't just push for the bill they also helped write for the bill much that's what representatives from both organ
place megyn kelly has a theory. >> we hear from people on the religious right who feel religion is under attack. i look at this bill and wonder whether it's an overreaction to people who feel under attack. >> jon: good point. an overreaction? why would people of faith, where would arizonans have gotten the idea that religion is under attack in this country. >> is our nation losing religious foundation? >> should but be punished for your faith? >> who is to blame for the holy breakdown. >> christmas under attack. >> it's a war on easter. it's a war on religion. >> american assault on religion. >> it's under attack. >> religious liberty is under attack. >> i don't understand the assault on christianity? >> unity and faith comes under fire. >> jon: why would religious people overreact to that [ male announcer ] when you switch to sprint's new framily plan, friends are like family, so who's gonna be in yours? let's get a sound guy and some roadies. [ male announcer ] but the more people you add, the lower the rate. how 'bout sketchy jeff? he gets billed separately, right? [ male announcer ]
saying religion has to be crucial for education. can't separate these two so consequently our response is we need to have the readings of the catholic bible under the direction of priests in public-school score give us money to fund our own parochial schools so we can have an integrated religious education and neither side could actually see the merits of the other side in this debate. it was highly contentious and tore apart communities throughout the nineteenth century on how to resolve this issue. supreme court for standard this debate about school prayer in 1948 in a case dealing with relief time. relief time was actually an interesting modification to respond to complaints about school sponsored prayer and bible reading in public schools as a way of accommodating all groups from ministers in gary, indiana in the 20th century, let's not have the schools be responsible for religious education, let's put aside a time during the day, and allow each religious community to bring in teachers or ministers to the children of that faith. and religious education on site. and in the first par
for businesses to discriminate against lbgt people. it was pushed by people who fear that the freedom of religion is under attack. but she pushed back saying there were no instances in arizona of religious freedom taking a backseat to lbgt right. >> senate bill 1062 does not address a specific concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i have not heard of one example in arizona where business owners' religious liberty has been violated. >> the thing is, arizona is not an outlier here anymore. at least 12 other states are looking at similar bills. oregon could even see something on its ballot this year. several of these efforts have run into roadblocks, sure, or even political abandonment following the outcry in arizona. but it is, we think, all part of a larger strategy on the right, invoking religion as a trump card in venues where there was actually a consensus that other, shall we say, nonreligious values rule. i'm thinking about like profits in the corporate board room or science in the public hospital. and where arizona's effort failed spectacularly, a more careful interpretation and v
more. and we will even get rid of them. but the catholics said that we think religion has to be crucial. we cannot separate these two. and we even need to have the readings under the direction of the public schools be a part of this. and we can have an integrated religious education. and neither side could see the merit from the other side and it was again highly contentious and it tore apart communities throughout the 19th century on how to resolve these issues. the supreme court first entered this debate about school prayer in 1948 in a case dealing with release time. it's actually an interesting modification as a way of kind of accommodating all groups. and let us put aside the time during the day, and we will allow each religious community to bring in one of their teachers and administrators from the children of that faith. and that became a common practice for the first part of the 20th century. and in the north and the west as well, it became a common thing. the supreme court heard a case on that of the first true modern case and they found not to be unconstitutional because it wa
's right to exercise his religion. but the legislation in arizona would have gone further, let owners of businesses refuse service, against gays and other marginalized groups. think muslims and mormons. jan brewer said her legislation went too far. but business big interests like chamber of commerce and companies called marriott, american airlines, apple and petsmart. in 1994 the national football league moved the super bowl out of arizona when it refused to make martin luther king a national holiday in their state. this week, the nfl threatened to take next year's super bowl out of the grand canyon state again. the next battle ground appears to be georgia where lawmakers are considering legislation similar to arizona's already big business is must mustering. sexual orientation are never mentioned in these bills. atlanta-based american airlines, say, mutual respect and dignity, the 165 million customers we serve every year. delta strongly post office these measures and we join the business community and urging state officials reject these proposals. for more, we go to stephanie stanto
does. >> in arizona, unlike other states, while there are protections based on rarks religion -- race, religion, national origin, there's none on sexual orientation. so already a business can say, "i don't serve gays", this is deflated. does it grant protection for gays or businesses to go ahead and discriminate. i think what it has done is shined the light on the fact that arizona is a state that does not offer protection for gays. folks rallied around that saying "why not?" >> how has it hurt the state? >> arizona had a history of problems, whether it's pr problems or not. after the governor of arizona cancelled a holiday for reverent mart mart martin luther king, a lot pulled out. if it does not change the laws, it underscores the question of does arizona think of itself as a friendly state. does it see itself as a place welcoming to everyone. for a company like apple. apple decided to build a plant here with 1200 employees. they are a gay-friendly company. they may think "do we want to located a plant where some. our employees may not feel welcome" >> what does it say about the st
that part is impressive. but the other side is the raising of a new terrorist. this is not about religion necessarily all that is central but look at the faces of the irish republican army, there is always a process of regeneration. i don't know we are losing but we're not making headway. good people right here have talked about public diplomacy for years but we're not showing some new arguments and imagination and determination believe need to make that succeed so we have made very little progress. this administration will not do better than the last one on public diplomacy. >> id your strategy area you don't mention the other programs of the capabilities that take a lot of money. you mentioned the cuts of the bush and administration what idiocy of of these non kinetic programs and funding levels of? >> thank you. you were careful to say on the skin you had not seen that but on a close reading you will see that and be happy to know there is day section what we can do with strategy and our partners can catch terrorists also. you are right i know how you spend your career at state with the
. he talked about freedom of religion, religious tolerance we have the first amendment freedoms, speech, press, assembly, religion. freedom to immigrate. think about that. when ronald reagan was president, everybody behind the iron curtain last the freedom to integrate. you couldn't go over the iron curtain. the secretary of defense anytime i ever mentioned the iron curtain to an audience, he said this to me shortly before he died if you're going to be around longer than me, do me a favor. any time you mentioned the berlin wall as your audience is one question. in whicquestion. in which correction to the east german guards who control the berlin wall in which direction they point their gun class east. on their own people. you're talking t to secretary defends the walls are built to keep the enemy from invading. this was a wall to keep people that wanted to be free from leaving. it had borrowed why you're over top. peter robertson that growth the tear down this wall speech, when he was pairing to write a speech there was gravel and it was fair so that a footprint seen there the night bef
're homosexual and their religion for bids homosexuality, that seems to me that is a magnitude greater than legal rights to deny services to a gay wedding where religion is purely involved in the sacrament of marriage. >> what is this about? we hear from folks on the religious right they say they feel religion is under attack i look at the bill and wonder whether this is a reaction, an overreaction, to people who feel under attack on this score, and in, in the end, you know, they may have thrust back in a way that is deeply offensive in a way to many and dangerous to folks who are -- needing medical services being denied. >> well, that is right. and i think it's a little hard to tell with the bill not having been signed and put into affect and tested, it was a would be in the courts. exactly how the bill would play out f it's fact it would go so far as to allow christian doctor deeply conservative in his views to deny treatment it's hard to imagine this, but i suppose it's possible, if that is the case it seems to be a big huge overreach. but i, look. this goes to a larger question. it's do peopl
was a homosexual. not true. you couldn't do that. there's no basis for that in religion. we're talking about marriages, about those ceremonies that really when you participate in them as described in the package about being artistic, you're affirming of something that runs counter to your religious beliefs. >> you're saying i can't ban -- i have the bill in front of me two pages for me saying you can do this if the person's refusal to act is motivated by religious belief. you're saying to me if i'm -- someone could ban me from coming in if i was married to another woman but not if i was simply a lesbian and not married to the woman? it's gay marriage that's your problem? >> that is -- it sets in place this has to be a religious belief that is deeply held and you can't just come up and create a religion. you can't come up and say, i'm not going to serve somebody this food and that would be inconsistent with a christian world view. christians want to serve people. where the issue is, and this is what happened in new mexico, what drove this was that you had a christian photography company that
in arizona this week and in you began uganda. a huge ongoing clash between religion and tolerance in my view, which is playing itself out good and bad in places. great in many ways. you're seeing a lot of gay rights being encouraged around america, for example, but in arizona a big backwards step in terms of the thinking of some people there. what's the way around this in terms of -- i have great respect for people who are very religious and interpret the bible in a certain way and it makes them have views about things like homosexuality or whatever it may be. i just don't like it when people who don't agree with something use bigoted rhetoric. i think that's a step too far. but there's a wider issue here of tolerance. and you guys are great examples of very intolerant, implaquable divides coming together. what do you think, roma? how's the best way to handle it? >> i think that perhaps as christian people we become known as people who speak out against things instead of being people who speak out for. and instead of what we oppose it's what we propose. and i think we propose love. i mean, w
a bill that would allow businesses to refuse services to gays and lesbian by invoking religion. jan brewer vetoed the bill. but cecilia vega reports it will not stop a nationwide debate. >> reporter: it was the arizona bill that ignited a national firestorm. >> nobody rides in the back of the bus and everybody sits at the lunch counter. we fought that battle once. that's what this battle is. >> reporter: with polls showing a public shift on gay rights. a majority of americans now support same-sex marriage. the pressure for arizona governor jan brewer to veto the bill was fierce. major american companies came out swinging, calling arizona's law bad for business. in the end, brewer vetoed the bill. >> religious liberty is a core american and arizona value. so is non-discrimination. >> reporter: this as some of the most conservative states have become the new battle ground in the same-sex marriage war. a federal judge striking down texas' ban. so-called religious freedom laws like the one so fiercely debated in arizona, now seen as yet another weapon in the fight by supporters of the b
there been a founding father separated church and state with a great reference for religion protected the rights to use in all other religious minorities to worship freely the are able to take advantage of all the opportunities economic social political cultural on the authentic interrupted to wake people the turning point came between eighteen eighty in nineteen twenty three an estimated two million european jewish immigrants looking for work in freedom landed on american shores new york's ty's first settled in the cramped and houses of the lower east side along with other immigrants they can be whatever he wanted to and they could be as they wanted and they could be americans as they wanted in an oven baked it and did it have on anybody of any consequence in uniting not really american. u s immigrants jumped into every facet of american life. there was discrimination in the private sector but it never had a lasting impact. i miss the way. lights on. dr request congress said she will always be grateful for the opportunities america gave her became famous thinks that this than six hun
to gays and lesbians for religions. it was supposed to be a safeguard tore religion but it is too divisive. >> i believe the bill has the potential th potential to cause more problems than solve problems. >> the bill drew vocal criticism from civic leaders business interests and state economic groups. >>> two members of former new england patriot eric hernandez's entourage is due in court today. hernandez fiancee was indicted on charges of perjury. she has treated not guilty. carlos or tease wegon ortiz wi appear today. he pleaded not guilty to accessory charges. hernandez is awaiting trial after also pleading not guilty. >> the road rage assault case will be back in court today. the detective is scheduled for a control hearing in new york. he's pleaded not guilty to gang assault charges in connection with a man being pulled from his suv and beaten in front of his family. >>> there will be no bags allowed at the boston marathon this year. officers are stepping up security after last year's deadly bombing. i a attackers used backpacks this year. runners will be allowed to check gear but ev
of religion, religious tolerance. we have a first amendment freedom can, speech, press, assembly, religion. the freedom to emigrate. think about that. when reagan was president, everybody behind the iron curtain lacked the freedom to emigrate. you couldn't, you know, you couldn't go over the iron iron curtainment reagan's secretary of defense, cap weinberger, anytime they ever mentioned the iron curtain to an audience, he said this to me about a year before he died, you're going to be around longer than me. do me a favor, anytime you mention berlin wall, ask your audience this one question: in which direction did the east german guards who patrolled the wall, in which direction did they point their guns? right? east. on their own people. he said, you're talking to a former secretary of defense. walls are usually built to keep an enemy from invading. this was a wall to keep people who wanted to be free from leaving. it had barbed wire over the top of it. peter robinson, who wrote the tear down this wall speech said he flew other with the military when -- over with the military, and there wa
businesses to use religion as an excuse to legally refuse service to anybody. gosh, now that's a pretty broad-brush, you know. no matter what brewer decides, it hasn't been fast enough. at the center of the storm is this person right here. you know what, there's just a damn good political operative in every state in america, isn't there? here's a good one for the conservatives, here name is kathy her rod. she's the president of the center for arizona policy. she's the architect of 1062. kathy herrod is not an elected official but wields power. she may be more powerful than the governor herself in arizona. >> in 2011, we reached a pinnacle for us that the arizona legislature over the last 15 years has passed 101 bills supported by center for arizona policy. those bills run the gamut of life, marriage and family and re religious liberty, we're blessed we've reached 100 bills and looking forward to the next 100. >> they're very blessed. there are hundreds of people like kathy herrod who work in the background to get this going, crafting legislation and then they push their own agendas. where are
to see again that religion was used to veil discrimination. it was just really a disappointing piece of legislation that it even came forward at all, and that in 2014 we're evening discussing this time of policy. i saw you on lawrence o'donnell's show last night, and you said you normally don't make public reference to your sexuality, but you had to take a strong stand, given what was happens in your home state. >> you know, i think sometimes you have to stand up and speak for what's right. when a bill like this moves through the political process, you know, whether it was discriminating against the lbgt community or another minority group, it's important to stand up and speak for what's right and speak from the heart. if my story helped illuminate that or provided insight to the other members of the house of representatives, to the type of impact it would have on individuals, then i hope that it helped. >> it's interesting, many decisions we have seen in our country have been made through the motivations of money, whether you person was afraid they would lose money or could stand to
against gays on the basis of religion. but iowa congressman steve king is still defending that law. why? king says that sex orientation is what he calls self-professed behavior. and therefore he says business owners might not know just who they can or cannot discriminate against. >> it's clear in the civil rights section of the code that you can't discriminate against people based upon -- i'm not sure i got the list right, but race, creed, religion, color of skin, those kind of things. and there is nothing mentioned in there on self-professed behavior. the one thing i reference when i say self-professed is how do you know who to discriminate against? they have to tell you. and are they then setting up a case? is this about bringing a grievance or is it actually about a service they would like to have. >> so what mr. king is saying there is that customers could claim to be gay just to entrap business owners into discriminating against them so they could then seek legal reparations. here is a further question. is religion not by his wording also self-professed? >>> finally, "12 years a sl
a national debate on religion and gay rights. the governor has been in washington, dc the last five days for a conference. last week the arizona legislature passed a bill to allow business owners to deny service to gays based on religious beliefs. several corporations including apple, say it would be bad for business. former republican presidential candidate romney is among those urging governor to veto the bill. katie marzullo will have more on the developing story at the top of the hour. >>> alameda county supervise (o)ors -- supervisors are going back to the drawing board called laura's law. under the law a judge can order outpatient treatment for people with a history of severe mental illness. each county must decide whether to adopt the law. supervisors were divided and decided to delay the proposal for 90 days while health officials come up with a better set of recommendations. >>> a new five career agreement to have google turn the downtown corridor of mountain view into a wireless holt spot. google is replacing the wi-fi network which is not functioning because of technology chan
's exercise of religion without showing compelling government interest. the orange states are states that if passed rfra-like provisions by court decision. you can see that in the wall street journal if you want to learn more about that. we are skipping with our colors. renÉe is waiting in california. good morning. caller: i wanted to correct one thing here. iticus that talks about man laying down with man. you guys get the views from the homosexual side but you also need to get the other side here. i don't believe in same-sex marriage. i hate the fact that people always want to compare homosexuality with racial. that has nothing to do with it. it is a lifestyle that they choose. i am an a store and christian, i should not be forced to make a cake for two women or two men. that is my right. the thing about it is, god will in the end.al say his were never changes. it is all the same. it was a sin before and it's a sin now. god does not hate the sinner, he hates the sin. you worry about the example of the wedding cake. that example also brought up in today's washington post in their l
exercise of religion, sincerely held religious beliefs. >> opponents of the bill claimed victory for an open attack on gays. >> this showed the nation that not all arizonians are like extremists, and that there are good people, and we want to lead the country forward, not backwards. >> a statement was issued, praising her decision. >> major corporations weighed in too. apple, american airlines, delta and the n.f.l. all urged governor jan brewer to veto the measure. >> it was a combination. business community and activist. >> it sent a message to the governor. >> and speaking of the business community, supporters of the bill have been saying that there is a lot of support by local businesses. one of our producers here made several calls, 50 businesses, dry cleaners, hair salons, and could not find a local business behind it. >> thank you. we should point out the veto of the bill in arizona does not end the debate open over religious freedom nationwide. it got further, being a signature away from the governor to become war. similar balls failed to pass in kansas, idaho, south dakot
. they thought they were pathetic. we hated it. if we were to say that about a certain religion or ethnicity the kind of things we said about our parents in the 60s we would be marched out of the room marching ourselves out of the room. >> your kids today vilifying their parents. >> i know better. >> there is parents are us. we are sweet and understanding. they come to us and say dad there are a lot of drugs in school. we go, yeah, how much are they going for? a oo whatever good things we did we are now the problem for america. we are this big generation. we are retiring we expect to collect medicare and social security. >> we are rudely living longer than people. >> all of these systems were fine and predicated on the whied that everybody died at 67. >> we are living this until 78 on average. >> and 140 if it is using up all of the money for the kids. >> we want all of the good expensive stuff medicine can provide now. we are going to vote to see how come cut. >> selfishly people are selfish. this isn't really our fault. we didn't set up these two systems that are going to break the back of
the mountain at what time it's a bunch of -- you know. but in the end he agreed the basis of their religion and ideas are is love. >> i don't do you find the time. >> i got plenty of time. >> you say it's easy. >> got plenty of time to go here and go to lunch. >> you have 20 businesses, 30, 40 businesses. >> no, i don't want 40 businesses. >> you have 20. >> i don't know how many i have but not 40. >> 25. >> a lot of smart people and i have less businesses than that for sure. >> you have more than 10? >> not even 10. >> you have more than 10. >> no, i have the all def digital. one music, one thing that has components to it. i have fashion and culture. >> you write books. >> i write books. >> you are in films. >> films and books -- i am in the film business, yes. and i am an a are no, yes. >> and you have the yoga thing going, the new spiritual center and yoga center. so that's a thing. >> that's a thing. you can count things, i have things. >> okay. >> they are not all businesses. >> we are getting mired in semantics is what i am saying. >> i have a lot of stuff going on. i handle it. i kno
under state law in arizona. race, gender and religion are but being gay is not. it wasn't protected before brewer vetoed the bill and it still isn't protected after the veto. the waiting photographer refused to fake pick kpurs of the gay couple and she was sued for it. the bill she vetoed was an effort to protect against the legal challenges that could result from discrimination. even with this bill gone there is no law on arizona's books that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation. at least 12 states this year has issued legislation like arizona to extend the tide. senator mike lee of utah, conservative republican has introduced the marriage and religious freedom act. as they scramble topaz these laws, though, the courts seem to be moving in the opposite direction, even when it comes to red state america. just this week a federal judge ordered officials in the state of kentucky to start recognizing the marriage of same-sex couples that were performed outside of the state. and in texas, federal judge struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the cur
debate over gay rights, religion, and discrimination. >> after weighing all of the arguments, i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation, i want you to know that i understand that long-held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. >> and you know, it's kind of a -- >> it's not really a defense -- >> no, the decision was met with cheers outside the capitol building. she was met with major corporations and -- the thing i don't like about twitter. to me, maybe i didn't know every nuance and detail about it, but just the idea that a lunch counter that someone would say, no, you're not being served here, somebody -- that was enough for me. i didn't realize how many different situations twitter people could come up with to show me that there was some time when this might make sense. it's like, i don't want to know all your splitting hair opinions about why
religion. >>> "american hustle" could win ten academy awards on sunday but it has heavy competition from "gravity." we will look at all the big nominees and actresses in the race and the actor called the one to beat. >> it's friday. right now it's time to show you some of the this morning's headlines from around the globe. kerry kennedy was acquitted this morning of drunk driving. a jury acquitted her. jurors needed two days to reach their verdict. >>> usa today says stethoscopes are covered in germs. researchers say stethoscope cleaning should be standard practice. >>> britain's telegraph says babies born by c section are at risk to be obese. >>> the washington post looks at why viewers are upset with a "jeopardy" contestant. his playing style goes against tradition. he asked the all-time "jeopardy" champion about the newcomer this month. >> what do you think about chew who is winning it in an unorthodoxed way. >> this is smart play. >> he solved all the big daily doubles before his rivals find him. >>> and then the dogsled race kicks off this weekend in alaska. the
that called virginia's ban on gay passenger unconstitutional. a pal just released by the public religion institute, it finds a majority of americans, 53 appearance, now support gay marriage. that same survey put support at only 32 appearance just 10 years ago. >>> there are new developments from ukraine tonight. the u.s. is once again crashing with russian president vladimir put putin, secretary of state kerry warning vladimir putin to be careful after he ordered military drills near the ukrainian border. >> reporter: the russian defense minister may have denied there's any connection between president putin's sudden military order today and events unfolding in ukraine. all one really needs to do is take a look at a russian-ukrainian border where these complex war games will be playing out the next six days or so and see how close it is to ukraine's flash points, like the pro russian eastern ukraine, just to understand what might be called vladimir putin's unspoken message, something like don't push me in my own backyard. still, for several days now we've seen one russian official after
allowed business owners to refuse to serve gays by citing their religion beliefs. here is what the governor said just minutes ago. >> after weighing all the arguments i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation i want you to know that i understand that long held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. i could divide in arizona in ways we could never imagine and no one would ever want. religious liberty is a core, american and arizona value. so is nondiscrimination. going forward, let's turn the ugliness of the debate over senate bill 1062 into a renewed search for greater respect and understanding among all arizonans and americans. >> many people owned this bill because -- opposed this bill because they believe it provided political will to discriminate. brian rooney explains. >> protest was loud, where the legislature once again they said made
fall simply along religious lines. i think there are a range of factors, politics, religion, economics and ideas about gender and sectixuality that impact ho people are safe or not. >> a quick thought: is there any effort at, say, embargos or sanctions against countries like uganda that have initiated these very tough laws? >> this is an incredibly controversial issue. there is a lot of debate about this. the uganda and lgbt movement is in heavy debate. civil society activists called for foreign governments to review their policies on foreign aid to uganda. they didn't call for foreign governments to withdraw aid. and this is a very important distinction that i hope hear. >> said, some governments have already made decisions about how the anti-homosexuality bill and now law will affect their aid to uganda and the government of denmark was one of the first to change its policies saying its hundreds of millions of dollars a year will no longer be given to the ugandan government, but it will be distributed among civil society in uganda. >> jessica sturn, thanks. >> thank you. >>> after t
of behavior do you think they could get away with, based on religion? i mean, what we're talking about here is an amendment to an existing law that has been in place since 1999. it simply is closing -- well, not really a loophole, but court interpretation. it was originally passed as when you were an individual and went into a business or marketplace, you don't lose your religious freedoms, but some courts have interpreted that. but they also put in place a test that would prove, you have to prove you have the basis for your religious objection. >> a lot of people ignored that. you couldn't just go out and -- and make up a religious belief. let me ask you this, folks on the other side this is what this bill was, the modern-day equivalent of you can deny services of blacks who want to marry whites. blacks that used to get together, that used to be against the bible, against god's teaching. that was outlawed for three centuries and was not deemed illegal to do so to discriminate against blacks and whites who want to marry until 1867. and folks opposed to it said this is the modern-day equival
religion and then fly into your eyes. >> this is obviously a relief for you. they served like 40 years and isn't that close enough to a life term anyway? it is not like they could do much now because they are so old. do you buy that a? >> they should do it the way the white house does with turkeys. put information and allow the people to vote, you know what i mean? this is cletis, he is a member and this is gold tooth. he is uh allergic to cleetis. >> that is true coming from you. >> you are a family of five, but got probation because you said the judge was, quote, super hot. how do you feel about this new thing? >> i am very grateful to have received a fair trial and have been acquitted. i don't understand this idea of governors pardoning people or giving them parole. after going through the process then one person can let them go after a board reviews whatever? but it is ultimately their say? that is ridiculous. these poor vehicle times who experienced comfort and know they have life in prison, then that goes away. >> that is the thing that kills me. they were hugging and crying 20 y
story but prince princed kings begin in kiev, and religion has the root roots in v as well. and certainly, vladimir putin, as a state builder, and somebody who wants to reassert to some extent what he calls awe uration union. >> rose: a uration union. >> that would include belarus and parse of central asia, and so on-- that the core of that is russia ukraine. and yet within ukraine, you have until some days ago, yae, who was loyal to moscow. you have the western part of ukraine which speaks ukrainian and leans towards the european union. you have the eastern part of ukraine that speaks russian predominantly, and leans towards moscow, and the crimea which leaps towards russia as well. there are all kinds of divisions here. what i would say is yanukovich was awful. on the other hand, he was democratically elected. and he was overthrown in the streets. he murder dozens of his open people. >> rose: during the protests. >> absolutely. he was as corrupt as corrupt could be. we are now in the-- in that very familiar moment that we've experienced over and over and over again in rec
service to gays and lesbians or anyone that disagrees with the business people's religion. so a muslim taxi driver could ,efuse to take a jewish person or a single woman traveling by herself. rush limbaugh has no credibility at all. the legislation was trying to write in prejudice, and to use his words, bullying and coercion into civil law and that is not allowed. a great have changed deal. when you have this massive corporate lobby putting pressure , isn't your traditional, you know, gay and lesbian activist and their supporters -- you had corporate america saying no to prejudice. >> because they recognize the economic realities here. g power as well as our allies as well as -- you know, i maintain the majority of americans are good, decent people, and they will not tolerate this kind of abuse of a legal process. the corporations recognize that as well. marriott, american airlines, delta airlines, apple was going to build a manufacturing plant in mesa, arizona -- vetott romney tweeted to the bill. >> leadership on the republican side. the two u.s. senators from the arizona side as wel
of religion, that goes to the contraception mandate. they can spin this any way they want, it is really the catholic churches, right? and for example in boston they're no longer in the business and service and ministry of adoption, why? because if they don't send the children to gay couples they're out of it. and in washington, d.c., the same thing. that is a fundamental change in the way the united states of america operates as a country. >> we'll be right back after a break. we'll continue, coming up next tonight right here on hannity. >> not driven by any moral circumstances, it is driven by budget considerations. he would much rather spend the money on food stamps than he would on support for our troops. >> the vice president was not the only one to slam the decision to gut the america's military. we'll weigh in on the national security right after the break and much more on this special edition of "hannity." [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whethe
, they feel this way by belarus, united by language, religion, culture. >> thank you so much. we appreciate your time. we'll check back with you a little later on. thanks so much. >>> president obama has been working the phones. he's been talking to vladimir putin, now calling u.s. allies looking for support. we're live from moscow and ukraine coming up next. we're getting ready. your hepatitis c.forget it's slow moving, you tell yourself. i have time. after all there may be no symptoms for years. no wonder you try to push it to the back of your mind and forget it. but here's something you shouldn't forget. hepatitis c is a serious disease. if left untreated, it could lead to liver damage and potentially even liver cancer. if you are one of the millions of people with hepatitis c, you haven't been forgotten. there's never been a better time to rethink your hep c. because people like you may benefit from scientific advances. advances that could help you move on from hep c. now is the time to rethink hep c and talk to your doctor. visit hepchope.com to find out about treatment options. and re
the nature of our country. >> predfreedom of religion, then spin this however they want insurance is paying for it but it is catholic charities and hospitals, right? >> for example in boston they are no longer in the business and the service and ministry of adoption. why? is because unless they send children to gay couples, they no longer get any of the services. washington, d.c. the same thing. that is a fundamental change in the way the united states of america operates as a country. >> we will take a break and come back and continue. coming up next on "hannity"." >> i am not driven by change or circumstances it is driven by budge t budget. rather spend money on food stamps rather than strong military or support for our troops. >> the former vice president wasn't the only one to gdecisio to cut the military. that's coming up after the break and more on this special edition of "hannity." ...and a choice. take 4 advil in a day which is 2 aleve... ...for all day relief. "start your engines" which is why he's investing in his heart health by eating kellogg's raisin bran®. not only is kellogg
of their religion, that's already covered under current law. the only group not covered under current or federal state law in arizona for nondiscrimination is gays and lesbians. everybody else is already covered. >> that's a separate issue, of course. just to go back to what you were saying, if you actually read the language of the law, it was a terribly drawn law. it was full of language like if there's a compelling state interest, then you can compel someone to even violate what he calls his religious conscience. the point is i think reasonable people can agree and we should find the areas of agreement, not disagreement. for instance, i do think we should agree that people should not be forced by government to do something that seriously violates conscience if it is based on a legitimate religious recognized in your church. however, that doesn't give you the right to ban access to what was called public accommodations. that was the basis for the greatest legislation in this area, the civil rights act of 1964. i think we ought to go back to that and specify public accommodations. >> but again f
a hotly debated religion bill, business leaders across the state are calling on governor jan brewer to veto the proposed law or risk damaging the state's image and its economic recovery. >> opponents now include the arizona chamber of commerce, the arizona super bowl host committee, apple which has major interests in this state, and both americans airlines and mare rot. now, as local and national businesses are making their voices heard, politicians both in and outside of arizona are pushing to distance themselves from the law. three senators from arizona who voted for the bill are now, actually, get this, are urging the governor to veto it. and state senator steve pierce told chris hayes last night, it was some sort of crazy mixup. >> i believe it was going to be slowed down, wasn't going to come to the floor as soon as it did. i can tell you there's a number of us that we were terxting eac other madly, do we go with it, do we not? so we made a mistake. that's about all i can tell you is we went the wrong way. >> yes. they went the wrong way. and it's too late to reverse that becau
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